Chicken, Broccoli, and Rice Casserole

Warm casserole dish full, of chicken, broccoli, rice, and love.

Chicken broc2

My Swedish Grandma raised 5 kids through the 50s and 60s, the age of frozen dinners, adding cans of food to other cans of food, and casseroles. During summer breaks, I’d spend weeks at time with my grandparents and other cousins at their home on Whidbey Island that is right on the water of Holmes Harbor. My cousins and I would play all day at the beach or they’d take us to the country club to golf, swim, or play Bingo. Since there were at least 3 grandkids there at time, she’d dust off the casserole dishes and prepare to feed a crowd.  Chicken Broccoli Rice is hands down my favorite. Tater tot casserole on the other hand, not my favorite. On those nights we’d always insist on eating on the deck that hung over the bank so we could “watch the sunset”. In actuality, we were eating the parts of the casserole that we liked and the rest went over the bank. Since my grandma had a strict “eat what is on your plate” rule this was our loophole. If we were still hungry after half our dinner went over the bank, we’d wait until she went to bed, sneak out of our rooms, make sandwiches and watch In Living Color which she’d never let us watch.

When we had our food truck, we’d share a commissary kitchen with Seattle’s most popular Hawaiian Korean fusion blue food truck. They cooked so much rice, it was insane, but they didn’t use a rice cooker they baked it. Turns out, It really is a genius way of doing it! I thought, “OMG, perfect base for my favorite casserole!” This is really the only casserole I make, my husband didn’t grow up having them (just meat and potatoes) so he doesn’t understand that every once in a while you need a casserole dish of comfort, which is what this casserole is for me. This casserole is not only my favorite, but also one of my mom’s favorites so she’d make it for dinner often.  For me this is probably the most memory filled comfort food, so if it’s a rainy day, literally or figuratively, this is what I want for dinner.

Yield: 1 9x13 casserole

Chicken, Broccoli, and Rice Casserole

Chicken, Broccoli, and Rice Casserole

Warm casserole dish full, of chicken, broccoli, rice, and love.

Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 40 minutes
Additional Time 20 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups White Rice
  • 2 Chicken Breast, sliced
  • 3 Broccoli Crowns
  • 1 cup Mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 can Cream of Mushroom Soup
  • 1 cup Mayonnaise
  • 1/2 cup Milk
  • 2 tablespoons Butter, melted
  • 1 cup Italian Bread Crumbs
  • 1 cup Sharp Cheddar Cheese, grated

Instructions

    1. Preheat oven to 350°
    2. Wash raw rice well, spread it evenly on the bottom of the casserole dish. Cover with enough water that it is an inch over the rice or use the classic Asian trick and measure up to your first knuckle of your index finger. Cover the dish with foil and place in the oven cook for 15-20 minutes until the rice is fully cooked.
    3. In a small bowl combine soup, mayonnaise, and milk season with salt and pepper, then pour 1/2 over the cooked rice.
    4. Slice the chicken thinly and lay in an even layer over the soup covered rice, then cover with the remaining soup.
    5. Break the broccoli into small florets and lay them neatly on top of the chicken.
    6. Sprinkle the whole dish with cheese.
    7. In a small bowl combine bread crumbs and melted butter and mix until every crumb is coated with butter.  Sprinkle the bread crumbs over the whole dish.
    8. Cover the dish with foil and bake for 30-40 minutes. Then remove the foil and bake for an additional 10-15 minutes or until the bread crumbs are golden brown and the sides are bubbling and the center of the casserole is at 180°

Hawaiian Fried Rice

Hawaiian Fried Rice, there is no Pineapple but there is the the trifecta of the island’s favorite meats Spam, Portuguese sausage, and lap cheong.

Fried Rice4

As I sit in my kiddo’s Dentist office waiting room, watching Moana for the 14th time while he gets a filling. I feel 3000 miles away from Hawaii (because I am). I’m over hearing other parents say they’re now in the mood for “Hawaiian food” and how they should order a “Hawaiian” pizza for dinner. I am reminded how much I hate it when people call things “Hawaiian” when it usually means some kind of totally unoriginal Americanized dish that has pineapple or coconut in it. Bleh! But growing up in Hawaii, and seeking out true Hawaiian restaurants, as well as growing up cooking Hawaiian food, makes it ok for me to call my fried rice, “Hawaiian”. There is no Pineapple, or coconut in it but there is SPAM!! In fact is has all my of favorite processed meats in it, Spam, Hawaiian Portuguese sausage, and lap cheong (Chinese sausage). If you haven’t had Hawaiian Portuguese sausage or lap cheong, you have not lived! Portuguese sausage is very similar (obviously) to pork linguica but in Hawaii it is not a hard sausage and it has a similar flavor to a chorizo but not as strong. Lap cheong is a harder pork sausage that basically is 50/50 fat to meat but has a satisfying sweet flavor to it. Then you add spam in the mix and it’s just the most amazing fatty trifecta of awesomeness! 

Hawaiian Fried Rice

When fried rice happens in our house, it is not a side dish to orange chicken. It’s not even a meal we’d have for dinner. When fried rice happens in the Rosauer house, it’s for breakfast. I don’t know why I only make it for breakfast, it’s just how I’ve always had it. Even my husbands family always had it for breakfast. My Swedish mom always made fried rice just like my Filipino grandma. While visiting with my grandma, every morning she would make fried rice at 4am for breakfast but we wouldn’t even get up until at least 8am! But, every morning it was always fried rice. She would always use at least one the meats from the fatty trifecta of awesomeness or sometimes she would  use Vienna sausages, which I never ate because there has to be a line drawn somewhere for canned meat products!

Yield: 8 Servings

Hawaiian Fried Rice

Hawaiian Fried Rice

Hawaiian Fried Rice, there is no Pineapple but there is the the trifecta of the island's favorite meats Spam, Portuguese sausage, and lap cheong.

Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 3 cups of cooked white rice (I use short grain, and usually its leftover from another night)
  • 1 medium Onion, diced
  • 2 Carrots, diced
  • 2 Celery sticks, diced
  • 1/4 a head of Cabbage, thinly sliced
  • 4 Lap Cheong, sliced into rounds
  • 1/2ish a Portuguese Sausage diced
  • 1/2 can of Spam, diced
  • 3 tablespoon Soy Sauce, more if needed
  • 1 teaspoon Sesame Oil
  • 1 teaspoon Granulated Garlic
  • 1 teaspoon Granulated Onion
  • 1 teaspoon Pepper Flakes
  • 2 teaspoon Sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • Green Onion, sliced for garnish

Instructions

To Start: Cook rice if you don't have any left over

  1. In your biggest fry pan (and I mean big, my pan in about 15 inches) cook Lap Cheong until some fat has rendered and it started getting a golden brown, then remove. Keep an eye on it as it cooks really fast!
  2. Repeat the step, this time the Spam then Portuguese sausage, in that order, not removing any rendered fat.
  3. With only the rendered fat in the pan, add in all the veggies, lightly salt and cook until all veggies are tender.
  4. In a bowl mix the soy sauce, sesame oil, granulated garlic, onion, pepper flakes, and sugar.
  5. Once the veggies are done remove them from the pan. Add oil and rice and cook until the rice starts to get crispy in the bottom.
  6. Add back to the pan all of the veggies and the meat and mix well. Add all the sauce, adding more soy sauce or salt to taste.
  7. In the same bowl that the sauce was in, whisk the eggs well. This way you can use up the remaining goodies left in the bowl as seasoning. In the frying pan make a well in the center of the rice, add oil if needed and scramble the eggs to a soft scramble before mixing into the rice.
  8. Top with sliced green onions and serve. It's also great if instead of scrambling the eggs into the rice, fry an over easy egg and top the rice with that!

Authentic Chicken Long Rice

Authentic Hawaiian in under 30 minutes, with leftovers! This dish was brought to Hawaii from Chinese immigrants who introduced Hawaii to Cellophane Noodles (Glass noodles, bean thread noodles, or Chinese vermicelli).

To me, Chicken Long Rice is the most underrated luau food. Every one knows Kalua Pork, Mac Salad, Spam Musubi, even Haupia. Every tourist style luau on the islands have chicken long rice but it’s always overlooked. It is one of my comfort foods. Also, like lots of my other recipes, it’s a great way to use up a leftover rotisserie chicken. I just make a pot of my Asian Chicken Stock and pick off any meat left on the chicken, add some sweet potato vermicelli noodles and mushrooms, that’s basically it. Authentic Hawaiian in under 30 minutes, with leftovers!

Chicken Long Rice1

This dish was brought to Hawaii from Chinese immigrants who introduced Hawaii to Cellophane Noodles (Glass noodles, bean thread noodles, or Chinese vermicelli). There is something so special about sweet potato vermicelli noodles, anything that they’re in, I’m going to eat it. They’re chewy, slippery and pick up any flavor that you add them into. My grandma used them in a lot of her cooking which is why I probably use them a lot and that they are total comfort food for me. Chicken long rice is a great side to a good plate lunch, you can cut some of the noodles out and have it be broth heavy a chicken soup which is best served over rice, or as a main dish with a side of sautéed cabbage and rice.

Yield: 6 servings

Hawaiian Chicken Long Rice

Hawaiian Chicken Long Rice

Authentic Hawaiian in under 30 minutes, with leftovers! This dish was brought to Hawaii from Chinese immigrants who introduced Hawaii to Cellophane Noodles (Glass noodles, bean thread noodles, or Chinese vermicelli).

Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes

Ingredients

  • 4oz Cooked Sweet Potato Glass Noodles
  • 1 Boneless Skinless Chicken Breast
  • 1/2 Onion, sliced 1/4in thick
  • 1c Shiitake Mushrooms, de-stemmed and sliced
  • 1 package of Clamshell Asian mushrooms
  • 2-4 c Asian Chicken Stock (depending on how brothy you want it.)
  • 3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 1/2 bunch Green Onions, sliced thin
  • 1/4c Soy Sauce
  • 5-6 dashes of Fish Sauce

Instructions

To Start: Boil the noodles following the package directions in salted water.  If you’re using raw chicken breast in some Asian chicken stock boil the breast until cooked through, then shred and use the stock for this dish.

    1. In a frying pan with a little oil and salt, sauté onions until tender, remove from pan and set aside.
    2. Sauté Mushrooms in batches with a little oil and salt, to ensure that every mushroom was browned, removing as they’re done.
    3. Sauté Garlic for a second in oil then add the stock, noodles, onions, chicken, mushrooms, soy sauce to the pan then season with the fish sauce, adding more if needed.
    4. Allow most of the liquid to absorb into the noodles if it is too dry add more stock if too much liquid then let it cook a little more.  There should only be enough liquid to coat the noodles with a little in the pan. Or add more broth if you are making it into a soup. 
    5. Once the liquid level is right, remove from pan onto a nice plate and garnish with the green onions. This is a perfect luau dish!

Notes

Alternatively: To make broth from a rotisserie chicken cover the carcass with water add, whole onion a 2in chunk of ginger sliced and smashed, and 4 cloves of garlic, bring to boil then let simmer about an hour or until remaining meat is falling off the bone. Remove the chicken from the broth and let cool before picking any meat off the bones, strain broth discarding any ginger, onion, or garlic pieces. Place broth back to the pot season with Soy Sauce and salt before moving on with this recipe. 

Guava Cake

A favorite Hawaiian dessert, perfectly spongey and sweet guava cake, layered with tangy guava filling, and finished with foolproof whipped cream frosting.

Guava Cake5

If you have ever been to Hawaii you have probably come across arguably what is Hawaii’s best cake, Guava Chiffon Cake. It’s the perfect dessert to follow Zippy’s chili, fried chicken, mac salad and, rice!! Or like me, a great breakfast the next morning after Zippy’s because I was too full for dessert. My dad was born and raised in Hawaii so when we moved to Seattle he’d seek out every Hawaiian restaurant there was. But in the 90’s there wasn’t a lot around, we’d drive 45 minutes just for a plate lunch. Thankfully there is a huge Hawaiian culture in Seattle now. There are Hawaiian restaurants, bakeries, and food trucks which are amazing, if you live in Seattle.

Guava Cake 7

I don’t live in Seattle anymore and I am even farther from a Zippy’s now, so when the craving for guava cake hits, it hits hard. Thankfully this cake is pretty easy with my short cuts/cheats, really after making everything for a luau why not cheat a little especially if no one can tell. The key to making a box cake feel like a true chiffon. I separate the yolks and whites and whip the shit out of both of them, all that air will make the cake light and fluffy and make people think you made it from scratch. Or even if you’re not making a full luau and really just need an easy impressive dessert that will please just about everyone.

Yield: 8-10 servings

Guava Cake

Guava Cake

Ingredients

Guava Cake

  • 1 box Strawberry Cake Mix
  • 1 cup prepared Guava Juice
  • 4 Eggs, separated

Guava Filling and Topping

  • 2 cups Guava Juice, the remainder
  • 4 tablespoons Corn Starch
  • 2 tablespoons Cold Water
  • Small pinch of salt

Whipped Cream Frosting

  • 3 cups Heavy Whipping Cream
  • 3 tablespoons Vanilla pudding mix
  • 3 tablespoons Powdered Sugar or to taste
  • Small pinch of Salt

Instructions

    Guava Cake

    1. Thaw guava juice concentrate and dilute with ½ a can of water.
    2. Butter 2 8in cake pans, pour a little of the cake mix into the cake pan to flour (I use the cake mix to flour) the pans making sure the pan is well-buttered and floured.
    3. Preheat oven to 325°.
    4. In a stand mixer, beat the egg whites until they are making sift peaks, place in a separate bowl, and set aside.
    5. Mix egg yolks and whip until light in color.
    6. Pour 1/3rd of cake mix into the yolk then add 1/2 of the guava juice alternating dry and wet ending with dry.
    7. Slowly fold in egg whites 1/3rd at a time to cake mix trying to keep as much air in the batter as you can.  Pour 1/2 the batter into each cake pan and bake oven for 9-12 minutes

    Guava Filling and Topping

      1. If needed add water to the remaining diluted juice to make sure it’s 2 cups of juice.
      2. In a small saucepan bring juice to a slight boil
      3. In a small bowl add corn starch and water and mix well.
      4. While whisking the juice slowly add in the corn starch slurry until the mixture is the texture of jelly
      5. Bring it off the heat and cool in the fridge while you finish the cake.

      Whipped Cream Frosting

        1. With a stand mixer add whipping cream to the bowl and mix for a minute or until it’s still liquid but with some bubbles.
        2. Add pudding powder, sugar, and salt and mix until doubled in size and looks like whip cream.

        Assembly

          1. Once the cakes are completely cooled, pipe a ring of frosting around the bottom layer and fill the ring with 1/2 of the guava filling making sure it is even all the way to the piped ring.
          2. Place top layer on top and frost the whole cake with a thin layer of frosting (crumb coat) then refrigerate for about 15 minutes
          3. Setting aside some for piping, frost the whole cake in a nice even layer.
          4. Pipe a decorative ring around the base of the cake as well as the outer edge of the top of the cake. I use a shell pattern or dots making sure to keep the guava topping from leaking through.
          5. Pour the rest of the guava on the top of the cake spreading it into an even layer making sure it’s right up to the piped line.
          6. Refrigerate for at least an hour to make sure the topping and frosting are set. Serve after a big ol’ plate of Kaula pork, mac salad, and rice (optional).

Hawaiian Mac Salad

A Hawaiian plate lunch staple straight from the islands to your plate.

Mac Salad3

You cannot have a plate lunch without Mac Salad! Chicken katsu, 1 scoop of rice and, 2 scoops of mac salad is my go to plate lunch, but the mac salad has to touch the rice so the mac salad gets a little warm and the rice has have just a hint of mayo which brings the rice to another level, especially with furikake, and now I’m hungry! I was born in Hawaii but I grew up in Seattle and I have always called Seattle home. I was fully aware of what I was missing in the means of food (and weather) from my birth place.  It was about 15 years ago when they opened an L&L Hawaiian BBQ just 2 miles away from my house, and my dad and I could not be happier! I’m pretty sure we ate there once a week for 2 months, and their mac salad was the best I’ve ever had. At the time, there was another mom and pop Hawaiian restaurant around but their mac salad was gross and the reason was because they used miracle whip which I DO NOT like. Come to find out that a lot of Hawaiian Mac Salads recipes call for it.

Mac Salad1

My final in culinary school was to create a whole menu to serve in the schools restaurant. My menu was Hawaiian so I could show case my comfort foods, it was like a fine dinning luau. As I was researching recipes and authentic cooking techniques, I had the hardest time finding a mac salad recipe that was as good as L&L. I was determined to figure out exactly what they put in theirs. I bought some mac salad and deconstructed it, tested, and tweaked it until this recipe was created. The following is the recipe I used for my final menu during culinary school. It was such a huge success that my school served it even after I was done and gone.

Yield: 8 cups (or enough to feed an army)

Hawaiian Mac Salad

Hawaiian Mac Salad

A Hawaiian plate lunch staple straight from the islands to your plate.

Prep Time 25 minutes
Cook Time 9 minutes
Additional Time 3 hours
Total Time 3 hours 34 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1/2 box Macaroni noodles
  • 1 cup Mayonnaise
  • 2 tablespoons Yellow Mustard
  • 2 tablespoons Lemon Juice (1/2 a lemon)
  • 1 can Chicken Chunks in water
  • 1 large Carrot, grated
  • 1 large Maui Onion, grated (or sweet onion)
  • Salt and Pepper
  • 2 Green onions, thinly sliced

Instructions

    1. In a big pot, boil the Macaroni following in salted water.
    2. In a very large bowl add mayonnaise, mustard, lemon juice, and chicken with 1/2 of the water. Mix well and break the chicken up as much as you can.
    3. Add the onion, carrot, celery, and macaroni mix until everything is coated evenly. if the dressing is too thick add more of the chicken water, salt, and pepper to taste.
    4. Chill in the fridge for at least an hour before serving, top with green onions to finish.

SPAM Musubi

Musubi is a thick layer of rice with a slice of Spam that’s been cooked in a sweet-ish sauce and wrapped in a thin slice of nori. Much like many dishes before it, the Japanese immigrant population got hold of SPAM and Musubi was born. Some people say it’s “spam sushi” which, I guess it is.

Hawaii is synonymous with SPAM. Thanks to WWII and the heavy military presence SPAM has become ingrained into Hawaiian culture. Much like many dishes before it, the Japanese immigrant population got hold of SPAM and Musubi was born. Some people say it’s “spam sushi” which, I guess it is. Musubi is a thick layer of rice with a slice of Spam that’s been cooked in a sweet-ish sauce and wrapped in a thin slice of nori. I grew up having Spam, eggs, and rice for breakfast, or spam fried rice, and SPAM musubi for an after school snack. So Spam and I have a long history and has always been a favorite of mine. Every time I visit Hawaii, one of the first things I seek out is, musubi. Which are pretty easy to find every gas station, drug store, or grocery store. But in my opinion, Walgreens has the best out there; specifically the Walgreens in Wahiawa.

What people may not know is there are many ways to make musubi sometimes the SPAM is sandwiched between the rice then wrapped, sometimes there is an egg in it, often there is furikake and are usually served warm, but are still great room temperature. Even though I moved away from Hawaii when I was young it still surprises me on how many of my family and friends haven’t tried SPAM. If you’re looking for a good gateway Spam recipe to try out on hardcore spam haters, try this one. It works every time.

Yield: 10 each

SPAM Musubi

SPAM Musubi

Musubi is a thick layer of rice with a slice of Spam that’s been cooked in a sweet-ish sauce and wrapped in a thin slice of nori. Much like many dishes before it, the Japanese immigrant population got hold of SPAM and Musubi was born. Some people say it’s “spam sushi” which, I guess it is.

Prep Time 30 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 can Spam Sliced about 1/4 in thick, should get 10 slices
  • 4c Prepared Sushi Rice
  • 1/2c Teriyaki Sauce
  • Furikake to taste
  • 5 sheets Nori, cut in half hamburger way

Instructions

    To cook the Spam

    1. In a frypan over medium heat, sear the spam until it’s light brown and crispy but still tender on the inside.  May need to cook in batches.
    2. Lay all the Spam in one layer in the frypan, lower the heat a little, and pour the teriyaki sauce on top. Cook the sauce, turning the spam making sure it is evenly coated but make sure to not burn the sauce! Since the teriyaki sauce has a lot of sugar, it could burn fast.
    3. Once the Spam is good and covered, remove from the pan and set aside.

    Rolling out the Musubi

    1. Cut the nori sheets in half so that it’s as wide as the spam.
    2. Take a musubi mold and place it on top of the nori about an inch from the edge. Fill the mold about 3/4th of the way with rice and press down so it’s about an inch and a half thick.
    3. Sprinkle furikake on the rice and lay the Spam on top, press the mold down again then remove from the mold.
    4. Wrap the nori fully around and secure it with some water.  Repeat until they are all done. I serve mine room temperature or heated just slightly if it’s a leftover.

Notes

If you don’t have a mold, use the spam can! Lay a large piece of cling wrap over the opening of the can and fill the can with the rice and pressing it down with a spoon to form an even layer. Making sure the cling wrap is still sticking out of the sides so you can pull the rice block out easily.

Kalua Pork

A Hawaiian classic, savory slow-cooked pork with ginger, garlic, and soy flavors. Perfect for any luau or a deceivingly easy weeknight crockpot meal.

Kalua3

Kalua pork, probably the most recognizable Hawaiian dish for anyone who has ever been to a luau in Hawaii. It usually is the star of the show because traditionally it’s a whole pig cooked in an emu, which is a big hole in the ground that someone has built a huge fire in to heat up lava rocks. Once the fire has died down and the lava rocks are incredibly hot they lay a whole pig wrapped in chicken wire (so the pig can stay together in one piece) covered in banana leaves or sometimes wet burlap, and buried with dirt to keep as much of the steam in as possible while it cooks for about 12 hours. The unearthing is always a big show before dinner starts and it’s pretty fun to watch. It’s always my favorite part of the luau, that and the hula dancers.

Kaula2

To start making your own kalua pork at home you have to start by digging a huge hole in your yard and fill it with rocks and fire. No? Not something you want to do? No worries, you can still make kalua pork at home and you can even use a crock pot!  It’s surprisingly easy to mimic the authentic taste of an emu cooked pig.

Yield: 8 servings

Kalua Pork

Kalua Pork

A Hawaiian classic, savory slow-cooked pork with ginger, garlic, and soy flavors. Perfect for any luau or a deceivingly easy weeknight crockpot meal.

Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 3 hours
Total Time 3 hours 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 4lb Pork Shoulder
  • 3 tablespoons Hawaiian Sea Salt
  • 1 tablespoon Black Pepper
  • 1 tablespoon Granulated Garlic
  • 1 tablespoon Granulated Onion
  • 2 tablespoons Liquid Smoke
  • 2 Banana Leaves
  • 1/2 cup Water

Instructions

  1.  Preheat oven to 400°.
  2.  In a small bowl, mix together the salt, pepper, granulated garlic, granulated onion, and the liquid smoke.
  3. Rub the shoulder roast with the Salt mix making sure that every nook and cranny is completely covered.
  4. Banana leaves can be a pain in the butt, but you can make it easier by either steaming them or if you have a gas stovetop, lay the leaves opened one at a time, and slowly drape over the fire.
  5. Wrap the roast with the leaves, tying it up with butcher twine.
  6.  Place the roast in a roasting pan with the water and into a preheated oven at 400° for an hour then reduce the heat to 325° and cook for another 3 hours or until fork-tender.
  7. When done remove all the banana leaves and shred the pork with two forks.

Serve with rice, sautéd sesame cabbage, and Mac Salad.

Notes

Once the pork is seasoned and wrapped in the banana leaves, drop that tasty parcel into a crockpot and cook on high for 4 hours or low for 8 hours.

Red, White and Blue Potato Salad

Not your Mama’s potato salad, not my mama’s and that’s the point! It also won’t take you half the day to make.

Not your Mama's potato salad, not my mama's and that's the point! It also wont take you half the day to make.

I don’t think there is a bigger debate within families of who’s mom or grandma has the best potato salad. My Mother In Law won’t even eat potato salad if it’s not her’s. But to me, my grandma’s potato salad is the best although this is not my grandma’s potato salad, not at all. The only downside with my grandma’s potato salad is that it takes half a day to make and I don’t always have everything on hand to make it. Even my Mother In Law spends most of the day just to make her potato salad. With twin boys running around I don’t have time to spend hours making a side dish. One afternoon, I forgot I needed to bring a potato salad to a pot luck that I had promised to make. There was no way that I was going to be able to make my grandma’s in the time I had. I boiled some potatoes and winged it.

Basically added my favorite flavors and my favorite (and underrated) herb and got this recipe that turned out to be a hit! It wasn’t like anyone’s grandma’s potato salad so there wasn’t that comparison and disappointment that it wasn’t. Not only was it a hit it also took next to no time. To save even more time, once I boil the potatoes I lay them on a cookie sheet and stick them in the freezer for about 15 minutes. Since it’s the 4th of July, I tweaked my normal recipe by changing out the potatoes. I usually use only red potatoes, but to make it more festive, I added Yukon gold potatoes and purple potatoes. I love that I can find purple potatoes at the store now, the only way we were able to get purple potatoes were if you grew them. If you want potato salad but don’t want to spend forever making one, or you want a crowd pleaser to try this one!

Yield: 8 servings

Red, White, and Blue Potato Salad

Red, White, and Blue Potato Salad

Not your Mama's potato salad, not my mama's and that's the point! It also wont take you half the day to make.

Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Additional Time 1 hour
Total Time 1 hour 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 pound Red Potatoes
  • 1 pound Yukon Gold Potatoes
  • 1 pound Purple Potatoes
  • 1/2 Shallot, minced
  • 1/4 cup fresh Dill, minced or 2T dried Dill
  • 2 cup Mayonnaise
  • 2 tablespoon Dijon Mustard
  • 2 teaspoon Salt
  • 1 teaspoon White Pepper
  • 1 teaspoon Granulated Garlic
  • 1 teaspoon Granulated Onion

Instructions

  1. Put the potatoes in a medium saucepan and cover with cold water by 2 inches. Salt the water generously. Bring to a boil over medium heat and cook the potatoes until fork tender, about 15 minutes. Purple potatoes cook a little faster than the other two so maybe cook them separately. Drain and put the potatoes, allow to cool completely. If you want to speed up the cooling place on a sheet tray in an even layer and place in the freezer for 10-15 minutes.
  2. Add everything but the potatoes to a big bowl, mix and check seasoning.
  3. Fold in potatoes until just mixed. Careful not to over mix so not to smash the potatoes.
  4. Let the salad sit in the fridge for at least an hour to fully cool and let the flavors marry.

Classic Beef Stock

Rich chicken broth, that can be added to any dish, use to steam vegetables for a quick and tasty side dish or sip on when you’re not feeling well.

Beef stock is the base to my favorite soup, who doesn’t love a French onion soup when it is done right? But beef stock is so much more than a soup base just like chicken stock you can add it to just about anything you’d add chicken stock to, add it to a pot roast while it’s cooking and make a great gravy with it, freeze it into ice-cube trays to add flavor to steamed veggies or stir fries, or if you want to be fancy you can reduce the stock into a great demi glace.  I use beef stock in my Asian cooking so often that I started making Asian beef stock. I usually find my stock beef bones either Asian Supermarket or the Latin freezer section at my normal grocery store, they always have the best price as well as availability or the best place is your favorite butcher

Beef Stock2

Though beef stock is a bit more laboring then chicken stock it’s still worth the effort.  The first step of beef stock is roasting the bones with salt and pepper until they’re a rich deep golden brown, saving the rendered fat!  From that point it’s pretty much the same process as any other stock or soup.


Yield: 4 quarts

Beef Stock

Beef Stock

Rich chicken broth, that can be added to any dish, use to steam vegetables for a quick and tasty side dish or sip on when you're not feeling well.

Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 6 hours
Total Time 6 hours 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 pound of Beef stock bones
  • 2 tablespoons Tomato paste
  • 2 medium Onions
  • 4 Carrots
  • Center of Celery Leaves and all
  • 1 tablespoon Olive Oil
  • 2-3 bay leaves
  • 1 tablespoon Celery seeds
  • 1 tablespoon Granulated Onion
  • 1 tablespoon Granulated Garlic
  • 1T Italian Seasoning
  • 1/2 cup red wine (optional)
  • 1/2 bunch of Italian Parsley
  • 2 teaspoon Ground Pepper
  • 3 tablespoons Salt (to start)
  • Water

Instructions

    1. Preheat your oven at 425°
    2. Roast the Beef bones until they are a deep golden brown (30 minutes), keeping the rendered fat.
    3. Rough chop onion, celery, and carrots (Mirepoix) you still want them to be about the same size.  The amount of onion, carrot, and celery may differ, but the main thing is that you want 2 parts onion, 1 part carrot, and 1 part celery. For a richer flavor roast the vegetables with the beef bones.
    4. Add drippings from roasting to an 8qt pot then add the mirepoix (salt) cook until the onions are translucent.
    5. Then add all the tomato paste, herbs, and spices except the parsley and salt and pepper, sauté for a minute to open the dried herbs up.
    6. Add all the Beef bones deglaze with the wine, once the smell of wine is gone add water until the mixture is covered with water about 2-3 inches over the bones. Add garlic, pepper, salt, and parsley.
    7. Bring to a boil and let the stock simmer as long as you can but at least 6 hours.  Usually, I start it late morning and bring it off the stove at bedtime.  I let the stock sit in the fridge overnight (mainly because I just don't want to deal with it anymore at the end of the day).  The next morning I pull off the weird gross disk of fat that has settled and cooled on the top then strain the whole thing using a colander inside my biggest bowl, toss the solids (or keep the bones for your puppies).  I then ladle my stock into my quart-sized containers and freeze. I usually get about 4 quarts of stock from this but it could very.

Chicken Ramen

A bowl of heartwarming broth, noodles, and tasty toppings that will bring your favorite Ramen place to your home.

It’s is cold out and you know what that means, Ramen for every meal! Thankfully there is a ramen house on almost every corner now, even in Spokane. For me, ramen has been a part of my diet for as long as I can remember. It’s always been my “chicken soup” when I’d have to stay home from school. Unfortunately, my dad was always the one who stayed home with me and he wasn’t the best cook, so it’d always be top ramen. Besides Zippy’s saimin in Hawaii, I’ve never had real Japanese ramen until Colby and I went to New York City.  His cousin who was living there at the time recommended we go to Toto Ramen. After putting our name down on the waitlist and waiting 2.5 hours at the bar around the corner, snacking on extremely overpriced guacamole, the 3 of us finally crammed into the smallest restaurant I have ever seen. This place was barely bigger than a food truck. We sat at the bar right in front of the giant stock pots of broth simmering away. It was humid, small, crowded, and I was a bit hangry at the wait, but all that disappeared once the noodles hit the lips. It was the most amazing ramen I have ever had!  

Once we got home I tried and tried to recreate that amazingness in a bowl, I started with my asian chicken stock as a base, added a bit of dashi and damn it is pretty damn close to Toto. Grabbed my favorite ramen noodles (sometimes double, I loves noodles) and topped it with my favorite things like chinese sausage, and fish cake and it was almost like I was in that tiny steamy place again. 

Yield: 4 servings

Chicken Ramen

Chicken Ramen

A bowl of heartwarming broth, noodles, and tasty toppings that will bring your favorite Ramen place to your home.

Ingredients

  • 2 quarts Asian Chicken Stock
  • 2 teaspoons Dashi
  • 1 tablespoon dried Seaweed
  • Ramen Noodles
  • 1/2 a bunch of Green Onions, thinly sliced
  • 4 baby Bok Choy
  • 2 tablespoons Soy Sauce (or to taste)
  • 4 soft Boiled Eggs, peeled and marinated in soy sauce
  • 1/2 a pack of Lap Cheong (Chinese sausage)
  • 1/2 block of Fish Cake (Kamaboko)
  • 1 pack white beech mushroom (or enoki)

Instructions

Broth

  1. Bring the stock to a boil
  2. Add the dashi, soy sauce; half of the green onions (white part), and seaweed let it simmer and reduce until the rest is ready.

Building the Bowl

  1. In a pan, sauté the sliced lap Cheong until it's golden brown and set aside.
  2. Slice bok choy in half-length wise and place cut side down in the lap Cheong drippings. Cook until the bok choy is tender and browned on one side (if you need, add a little stock to the pan and cover to steam them a little to help finish them off).
  3. At the bottom of the bowl, add 1/4 of the noodles then cover with hot broth. Add the lap Cheong, bok choy, green onions, peeled and cut in half eggs, sliced fish cake, and sesame seeds then top off with sriracha, and sesame oil to taste.

Notes

Other Toppings that are equally amazing!

SPAM

Portuguese sausage

Braised Mustard greens

Miso paste

Potstickers/ wontons

Rotisserie chicken

Furikake

Chili pepper flakes

Corn

Toasted Garlic

Whatever sounds good to you!

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